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Thursday, March 31, 2005

Blogging on Blogger = Entering Google quickly

I knew it!

At most one day after posting my review of this year's batch of Miss Singapore Universe hopefuls, the Blogger entry appeared on Google almost immediately. How do I know? I went through my referrals in Sitemeter and found a search for "destiny ong" on 30 March.

BUT there were no search results for the exact same entry in LiveJournal. Of course, there could be a perfectly valid explanation for this discrepancy, but as Sherlock Holmes (or someone) said, "the simplest explanation is usually the correct one."

Congratulations, IP number 202.56.2.# (Sitemeter won't give me the actual number)! You've proven my theory about Google and Blogger.

Let's see if lightning strikes twice:
Here are the names of the Miss Singapore Universe 2005 contestants: Natasha Riard, Jacqueline Ong, Crystal Kang, Swyn Teo, Yvonne Lim, Arwyn Siah, Linderr Jasni, Jing Mok, Jeannie Fong, Lorraine Lai, May Ng, Ivy Lai Chiew Lian, Rebecca Lim, Blyss Chin (she's a babe, but I suspect that she won't win), Cheryl Tay, Destiny Ong, Ling Lee, Edwina Tan.

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ACJC reunion photos

Me, Adrian Heng and Lionel Tan
It took me a while, but I've finally got the four pictures from the reunion online.

To the right are two of my ex-classmates. There are also photos from the SB combination (2 sciences, 1 maths, 1 other (usually Economics, but I took Computing)) and group photos.

Enjoy!

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Sunday, March 27, 2005

Timor-Leste -- update

Today, I spoke to our church's coordinator for the Timor-Leste trip and learned a few things:
  • we'll be going together with two other churches, one of which is Living Sanctuary
  • there'll be a total of about 17 people, five of whom are from my church, one of whom is yours truly
  • we will be focussing on one village
  • that village is about 45 minutes from Dili
  • ...which means we should be able to return to our hotel room every night
  • ...unlike some other church groups whose villages our hours away from Dili
  • there should be a combined training session next week
She also told me about her "adventures" with my mobile phone number. I am one of a growing number of mobile phone subscribers in Singapore whose numbers start with "8", whereas the majority of the numbers start with "9". So initially, she thought of tacking a "9" in front, but that would be one too many digits in the number.

Then she, like many of my friends and colleagues, thought that I had misquoted a "8" for a "9". She doublechecked with another church member, who confirmed that my number does indeed begin with a "8". And all is well.

While at church, I also got pats on the shoulder and "good for you"'s from the pastor and an ex-elder.

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Saturday, March 26, 2005

There goes another idea

For a while, I had this idea of starting a search website that would remember what you have searched for. Instead of being a search engine itself, it would link you to other search engines, like Google and Yahoo!. And it would also link you to online treasure troves, like Wikipedia for information, Flickr for photos, and even Technorati for the blogosphere.

And then today, I surfed on over to Amazon's A9, which I'd heard about but never checked out. And lo and behold, there was my idea, up and running, and growing.

So, that idea's out of the window. And to think that a friend said that that such a website/service would be a bad business investment.

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Miss Singapore Universe 2005

Let me do something reeeeeally shallow: rate this year's batch of Miss Singapore Universe wanna-bes. A few notes:
  1. I am not going to give a general judgement like "they all suck" (even if it's true). Oh no, these girls are willing to let themselves be paraded in public and submitted to much mockery and scorn. No, no, no, they've invested so much effort that I shouldn't discount them just like that.
  2. I will judge based solely on looks... because, face it, that's all the judges care. "World peace?" *pfft*
On with the show.

Natasha Riard
Natasha Riard
Age: 20
Height: 1.78m
Occupation: Undergraduate
My comments: Long face, big head

Rating: 15/18
Jacqueline Ong
Jacqueline Ong
Age: 22
Height: 1.71m
Occupation: Graduate
My comments: Small eyes, large nose.

Rating: 18/18
Crystal Kang
Crystal Kang
Age: 20
Height: 1.69m
Occupation: Student
My comments: Bulbous nose, fake smile.

Rating: 4/18
Swyn Teo
Swyn Teo
Age: 19
Height: 1.70m
Occupation: Undergraduate
My comments: Big eyes, big head, small body, looks gentle.

Rating: 3/18
Yvonne Lim
Yvonne Lim
Age: 21
Height: 1.68m
Occupation: Undergraduate
My comments: Square face.

Rating: 10/18
Arwyn Siah
Arwyn Siah
Age: 23
Height: 1.66m
Occupation: Flight stewardess
My comments: Big cheeks, thick calves.

Rating: 11/18
Linderr Jasni
Linderr Jasni
(Viewers' choice winner)
Age: 18
Height: 1.66m
Occupation: Student
My comments: Puffy cheeks, looks like a small girl. (What is up with her hair designer???)

Rating: 8/18
Jing Mok
Jing Mok
Age: 24
Height: 1.65m
Occupation: Marketer
My comments: Big forehead, looks like a guy.

Rating: 16/18
Jeannie Fong
Jeannie Fong
Age: 19
Height: 1.67m
Occupation: Student
My comments: Eyes far apart.

Rating: 7/18
Lorraine Lai
Lorraine Lai
(Viewers' choice winner)
Age: 19
Height: 1.65m
Occupation: Undergraduate
My comments: Looks tall, weak eyes, nice smile, creases around cheeks/mouth.

Rating: 6/18
May Ng
May Ng
Age: 26
Height: 1.66m
Occupation: Banker
My comments: Small eyes.

Rating: 9/18
Ivy Lai Chiew Lian
Ivy Lai Chiew Lian
Age: 24
Height: 1.66m
Occupation: Flight Attendant, Part-time Student
My comments: Small nose, looks old.

Rating: 12/18
Rebecca Lim
Rebecca Lim
(Viewers' choice winner)
Age: 18
Height: 1.66m
Occupation: Student
My comments: Small body, weak smile, pointed jaw.

Rating: 5/18
Blyss Chin
Blyss Chin
Age: 22
Height: 1.67m
Occupation: Undergraduate
My comments: Pretty, may appear frail.

Rating: 2/18
Cheryl Tay
Cheryl Tay
Age: 24
Height: 1.70m
Occupation: Veterinarian
My comments: Eyes far apart, low nose, square jaw.

Rating: 13/18
Destiny Ong
Destiny Ong
Age: 21
Height: 1.69m
Occupation: Undergraduate
My comments: Looks like baby fat around cheeks, overall good-looking.

Rating: 1/18
Ling Lee
Ling Lee
Age: 19
Height: 1.73m
Occupation: Undergraduate
My comments: Big ears, looks like a "dragon lady", wide smile.

Rating: 14/18
Edwina Tan
Edwina Tan
Age: 21
Height: 1.73m
Occupation: Undergraduate
My comments: Crease around cheeks/mouth, looks old.

Rating: 17/18

Yes, my ratings are quite arbitrary. Probably the only ones you can trust are the first and last few.

By the way, all contestant photos are copyright MediaCrap MediaCorp Singapore Pte Ltd.

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TreeTop Walk

Some time back, a treetop walk was erected in MacRitchie Reservoir Park, the second (that I know of) in Singapore (the first is at Kent Ridge Park). My father had been wanting to go for the longest time, but we just couldn't find the time. Finally, today, we did.

After eating roti prata for breakfast, we went to the park... and found ourselves in the midst of a traffic jam because there was a biathlon going on. The car park was packed and vehicles were moving at a snail's pace. But as luck would have it, a van pulled out of a parking lot and I was next in line to snag it. Later, we learned that there was also a dragonboat race between higher education institutions, which added to the packed car park.

The park is laid out such that the car park is at one end of the reservoir and the treetop walk is sort of at the other end. So my parents and I began our 5.5-km walk to our destination at around 9am, at about 16-20 minutes per kilometre (yes, I timed it).

As the name implies, the treetop walk is a walk across a suspension bridge that gives you an aerial view of the tree tops in the park. It takes about five to 10 minutes to cross it, but the view is breathtaking... after you overcome any fear of heights and vertigo. The bridge swayed but of course it was all safe and sound. I looked down a few times, just to appreciate how high we were. And I looked at the view. It was quite beautiful to see all of that untouched (more or less) nature.

On the way back, we climbed up Jelutong Tower, a six-storey structure that gives you an equally impressive view -- coupled with a cool breeze -- of the park. We rested there for a while before resuming our trek back to the car park.

Along the way, we saw a group of monkeys foraging at the footpath. They're quite tame because even though I came close to them to snap a few pictures on my cameraphone, they hardly flinched. At the most, they would turn away (and deny me a facial shot). One monkey even scratched the ankle of another passerby, though it jumped back in fear when he turned to see what had scratched him.
One monkey
Two monkeys
Monkey eat

After washing up, we proceeded for lunch, and just in time too, because it started raining. Talk about good timing.

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Friday, March 25, 2005

I see dead people...

Well, no, I didn't actually see dead people, but I went to the crematorium columbarium at Poh Huat Road today. Is it called the crematorium? I don't know. It's not where you cremate the dead, but where you store the ashes. Sorta like a graveyard, but no graves, only urns of ash hidden behind marble slabs for the gravestones.

It's Good Friday, and on almost every Good Friday, my mum's side of the family would visit the graves, not for some morbid Salem-like witching ritual, but to remember those who came before in our family. There's my great-grandfather and his wife, my grandmother, and my grandaunt and her husband.

So there we (my and two other families) were, admiring the marble slabs with the photos and inscriptions. When we were young and visited the actual graves (before those were exhumed so that the land could be used for housing and new development (in land-scarce Singapore, even the dead have no rest!)), our parents made us bow in front of the gravestones. Looking back, as Christians, should we have done that???

But we're older now, some with spouses, and we don't bow. We look, we remark, and then we compare handphones. Or we look at the marble slabs of the other "residents". I remembered that there was a young kid, a boy, I think, somewhere nearby, but I couldn't locate him. That's the only one I remember in the vicinity because the boy died at such as a preteen, if I remember correctly. How sad.

We were there for about half an hour, and then we went to Little India for dinner. Over dishes of mutton and chicken and fish head curry and squid, I somehow got to talking with my uncle, auntie, cousin and cousin-in-law about karaoke in Singapore and what goes on in the "unclean" ones. Not that I know firsthand, rather, my knowledge is based on what I've read and what others have said.

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Monday, March 21, 2005

Trepidations about Timor-Leste

(Wah, big word, "trepidations"!)

The trip became real today when my boss signed my leave form. He, like everyone else, was surprised to hear that I'm going to what is commonly thought to be a God-forsaken place.

I've been reading up on Timor-Leste to familiarise myself with the country. One big help has been Virtual Tourist. From what I've read, it seems that I should have only three big worries:
  1. malaria
  2. security
  3. language
Since I'll be there on a church trip, I don't think I'll have many opportunities to sightsee (there's apparenty a great beach/outdoors place at Atauro Island), but I hope we'll be able to see the statue of Jesus, which is apparently close to the airport. Hey, it's a church trip, I think we can find an excuse to go there, heh!

Accomodation-wise, I haven't read anything negative. The only negative thing I heard is about the polluted water, even in the hotels, but I don't know how true that is. There also is supposedly a hotel run by Singaporeans and Malaysians, maybe we'll be staying there?

I've decided not to think about security for now. It'll just put me off the trip. I do hope we have a capable guide.

(As you can tell, I haven't been briefed about the trip, aside from the travel period and cost.)

Instead, I'll focus on learning "Tetum", the national language. Unfortunately, the much vaunted English language will be of little use because less than 5% of the population can speak it, and you can bet that these are the higher-ups/elites. The other major language is Portugese.

According to this guide to Tetum phrases, it seems that the language's grammar/syntax is relatively easy to grasp. After perusing a few phrases, I can figure out some direct translations, e.g.
  • "what" = "saida",
  • "you" = "ita",
  • "diak" = "okay/fine", etc.
And from what I can gather from the few phrases there, it seems that I can translate directly from broken English into passable Tetum. These, of course, are just phrases. I wonder what full sentences are like.

Oh, and to think that I suck at learning non-English languages.

Things to do:
  • find my backpack - I'm sure my mum has it stashed somewhere. I don't intend to lug a suitcase.
  • begin a malaria treatment
  • buy lots and lots of mosquito repellant
  • buy water purifying tablets
  • beg/borrow/steal/withdraw US dollars
  • learn Tetum
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Saturday, March 19, 2005

Glimpses of Light

This afternoon, my parents and I went to the opening ceremony of a photo exhibition, "Glimpses of Light", which showcased the tsunami recovery efforts by Mercy Relief, a local non-governmental organisation. My brother-in-law had some photos from his stint in Meulaboh (in/near Aceh, Indonesia). There were also photos from Banda Aceh (Indonesia), Sri Lanka and Singapore.

We were told that the ceremony would begin at 3pm. It didn't begin until about 3:15pm, when the guest-of-honour (GOH), Tharman Shanmugaratnam, Minister of Education, arrived. (I wonder why they didn't call the President, since he lives just next door... oh wait, nobody really lives there.) There were speeches by the chairman (?) of Mercy Relief, a volunteer (who also "treated" us to a song that was just too cringe-worthy for my liking), and the GOH.

While waiting for the GOH to view the photos, I decided to just walk *around* the exhibit (it's an enclosed area in an open space at The Atrium @ Orchard), but was shooed away by a volunteer because I wasn't supposed to be there. Okay, I smiled and returned to join the masses.

The photos were striking and memorable. All of them (from the tsunami-affected areas) showed the hardship that the survivors have to endure as they rebuild their lives. Some photos showed houses that were decimated by the waves. One (from Sri Lanka) showed some Down's syndrome youths staying at a run-down building because their centre was destroyed.

It's all very sad to look at, but you won't know exactly how they feel until you go there. My bro-in-law, in an interviewed with Channel NewsAsia, mentioned that his most memorable photo was of a woman who had lost her entire family, and how it affected him and his team because it was their last day and they were congratulating one another for "a job well done". Sometimes, things just aren't real until they smack you in the face.

There were some refreshments (eclair, dumplings, sandwiches, salad), but no one could eat until the GOH had taken his share, and I guess he didn't realise that because he was chatting with some VIPs while the rest of us stood on, until a volunteer told him about the food. And then the rest of us could eat as well.

We left at about 5pm to shop for a while. I was supposed to buy shoes for work, but the John Little outlet at Plaza Singapura doesn't sell shoes. In the end, I bought some briefs and two polo T-shirts. We then went to Chinatown for claypot rice, then returned home.

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Belated birthday dinner

I met Shu-er yesterday evening for a belated birthday dinner treat, though we went dutch in the end. We ate at Marina Square food court (and I got to know where her old workplace (DP Architects) is), which is a horror to find because of the labyrinthine layout of the mall and the ongoing renovation works. As she remarked, it's an architect's nightmare, to which I responded, "Which is why we need better architects."

There was a young family eating at the table next to us, and I admired the little baby (girl, I think) just sitting in her stroller, calmly watching her mum eat her dinner. Shu-er was surprised that married couples would choose not to have babies. I had to explain that that's why the government has been promoting its baby bonuses so regularly.

After dinner, we walked to Millenia Walk, which took longer than expected because we were unsure of the area. Again, bad layout/planning by the designers. I joked that that's why an MRT station is being built there: so that shoppers know how to get there. There's an Australian fashion display there, but by the time we arrived (after 9pm), the exhibits were still on display but there were no lights or promoters or other stands.

We admired the dresses (I often wonder why fashion designers design clothes that no sane person would wear), then went to the nearby coffee/tea/juice joint (I forgot its name). They have these huge red chairs that are soooo comfortable, you could fall asleep in them. I ordered iced fruit tea, which consisted (optimistically) of 2/3 drink, 1/3 ice.

She had to go back to the office to rush some work, so I offered to walk her there. Besides, it's only a 15-minute walk from Millenia Walk to the Lau Pa Sat area, no big deal after having trekked countless miles in my four years of university.

We went up to her office, and now I know what it's like after listening to her stories for so long. It's basically one big room, very open-concept (no cubicles), boss sits in plain sight of everyone, and very white (white walls, white cupboards, white tables). There were a few others working late as well, and when we left, they were still there.

I didn't plan to stay long, but somehow I did. While she worked, I looked through some of the architecture books, then helped to sort out her various drawings. To the untrained eye, architectural drawings are big messes of lines and symbols and small writings. It's like asking a non-technically inclined person to read HTML or source code for a software.

We finally left at about 1:15am. I shared a cab home because she can claim the expense, haha. Apparently, working this late is par for the course for her, poor girl. For me, I'd be in dreamland by 12am, latest.

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Friday, March 18, 2005

Short film, anyone?

Okay, I've been inspired to do a short film, because of the Panasonic-MDA Digital Film Fiesta competition. The deadline is four months away, July 25. Top prize includes a 17" iMac and an iPod photo. You tell me, who dowan??? And if I don't win even the 3rd prize ($1,000 Panasonic voucher), well, at least I gain some experience.

A few stories have been brewing in my mind, but for the sake of time, resources, and lack of any prior experience, I think I'll do the simplest story I've come up with, which is a reporter interviewing a subject. If all goes well, all it requires are:
  • two actresses, late 20s to early 30s
  • a grand apartment with large hall, sofa set, coffee table
  • teapot and two cups
  • microphones, lights (key, back, fill) (I already have the camera)
  • one-day shoot (!)
Heck, I'd film it in my house, except that I think the furniture is too "cheena".

So, anyone interested in making a short film?

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Monday, March 14, 2005

Happy birthday... to me!

Happy birthday... to me!
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Friday, March 11, 2005

(JC) Kids these days

So if this blog, drift'away_, is any indication, Singaporean teenagers not only cannot write properly, but they think small text in small boxes is readable and, especially for those from Innova Junior College, enjoy being truant.

I think I know how my teacher relatives feel... *shakes head in despair*

(I came across this blog after clicking on "Next Blog >>" on Blogger/BlogSpot often enough...)

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Going to Timor-Leste

Today, I confirmed my participation with my church's exploratory trip to Timor-Leste (that's East Timor to the rest of you! hehe). Apparenty, the government there has opened its doors to allowing religious organisations to help the country in whatever way it can. So my church has decided to take that first step.

Based on what I know, this trip will be to find out what the church can do, thus the "exploratory" part. It's a small team of folks (unless more people join from now till mid-April) who, I think, have never been to that part of the world.

So why did I volunteer? Several reasons come to mind, but the primary ones are:
  1. I need a holiday.
  2. I want to visit a regional country, instead of thinking of grand destinations like America or Europe.
  3. it'll be like stepping into a timewarp to the 1950s or so (if my impression of the country is correct).
  4. I find out how I can help others.
  5. I've always wondered what a mission trip is like.
That last point is especially ironic. I remember that when I was in Sunday School in my early teens, the teacher once asked how we'd participate in mission trips. Everyone said that they would go, while I was the only one who said that I'd give money and that's it. Years later, most of those people have gone on mission trips, some have not, and then there's me.

This five-day trip will set me back $1,600. Apparently, there are very few flights to Dili, the capital. The one we're flying is the only airline between Bali, Indonesia and Dili, so because of its monopoly, it can charge US$280 (two-way) for just that leg. There's a cheaper flight, but that's via Darwin, Australia.

I plan to bring my good ol' camcorder, so hopefully I'll have something to show when I return.

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Monday, March 07, 2005

iPod Nation

I've been meaning to write this for a while, and I think I should write it before it's no longer true.

Based on my cursory observation of people with earphones dangling from their ears, I have come to this conclusion:
  • half the people wearing earphones are using iPod earphones, and
  • most of the other half are handphone-connected earphones.
(This observation is made around Singapore, i.e. West Coast, Orchard, Raffles Place, in the MRT trains, on the buses, fellow pedestrians, etc.)

The significance of this observation is this: in spite of local company's Creative Technology's much ballyhooed push to grab the majority share of the digital music player market, it still trails Apple Computer by a huge margin. So much for the former's US$10 million (or however much they were going to spend on advertising and marketing) war chest, it seems.

I'm not against buying and/or using local products. I tried a Creative Zen player, and it's no big deal. The display isn't clear, the navigation is only up-down, and the device looks like something from the 1980s. It's comforting to know that people who reside in Singapore recognise good style with function.

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Saturday, March 05, 2005

ACJC Class of 1995 10-year reunion

Has it been 10 years since I "graduated" from Anglo-Chinese Junior College?

I went to the 10-year reunion at Raffles Town Club. The organisers had booked the President Suite for the entire night, so all of us were treated to a penthouse-like hotel room. How big? Let's just say that you could fit a single bed in the guest restroom.

Finding the suite, on the other hand, can be difficult in the labyrinthine building, unless you actually read and follow the instructions, and then realise that it's a "suite" and is therefore like a "hotel room", which are tucked away behind an inconspicuous door.

About 100 turned up at varying times. As someone joked, it was "wedding dinner timing", i.e. the average time that people would show up would be around 8 or 9pm. For the record, I arrived at 7:15pm, 15 minutes after the supposed start time. I was the 10th or so to arrive.

I talked with a few old teachers (yup, a handful attended the event as well) and some familiar faces. And it was there that I realised that my new next door neighbour (as in our apartments are literally just seperated by a staircase) was also from my year in ACJC! I was totally floored by the revelation. What a small world! But I didn't interact much with the Arts people back in the day, which is why I wouldn't have known her before.

We had a buffet dinner with Western-style salads and Eastern/local-style entrees, topped off with jelly cocktail dessert and fruits.

There were five people from my ex-class, which was something of a record for a class from the SB (two-science combination) faculty. The biggest group of people came from the Arts, with about equal numbers from the three Science faculties and the now-defunct Commerce faculty.

Which led me to believe that this wasn't much of a reunion as it was a night for old cliques to hang out. The only method of publicity for the event was via email and word-of-mouth, therefore if you weren't in the clique or you didn't happen to receive the email, you wouldn't have known about it. I spoke with an ex-classmate, Adrian, about how some other ex-classmates had not turned up, and he said that they wouldn't fit in anyway. That was so true. There were moments when I too felt like a fish out of water.

So because of the "clique phenomenon", almost everyone knew what everyone had been up to. As for me, this was my first chance to find out who was doing what, who had hooked up with who, who was their own boss, who was rich, etc.

Another general observation about where everyone was 10 years later:
  • the smart ones ended up in engineering, law or the civil service
  • the saavy (smarmy?) ones got into the financial world (banking, investments, etc.)
  • and then there were the rest of us, most of whom seemed to have ended up in something Web design-related.
And that's what happened 10 years after 1995. Nothing quite like the TV show, "High School Reunion", ha. On the other hand, I would have liked having more old boys and girls turn up, even if they wouldn't have fit in. If enough people appeared, I'm sure everyone would fit in.

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Wednesday, March 02, 2005

Got a new (old) PowerBook!

The company is clearing out its old IT equipment, and I just scored an Apple PowerBook 520c! And it's still working! And it has Microsoft Office!

W00t!

There are a couple of other old Apples hanging around. If they're available, I just might bring some home...

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Filipino babies for Singapore

It seems that the Philippines has an out-of-control baby boom. And Singapore definitely has an out-of-control baby dearth. And Singapore and the Philippines have had close ties for a long time. And ASEAN member nations are always talking about helping to solve one another's problems for the benefit of the region.

So why don't these two countries solve each other's baby problems? Here's my off-the-top-of-my-head solution:
  1. Offer Singapore citizenship to newborn Filipino babies, provided:
    1. the parents also become Singapore citizens, and
    2. they renounce their Philippines citizenship, and
    3. the children are raised in Singapore.
  2. As an incentive, give the baby bonuses to the Filipino parents to start their families.
Notes:
Point (1): Who in Southeast Asia doesn't want a Singapore citizenship???
Point (2): Oh, but we're giving OUR money to THEM, which is WRONG. Puh-leaze! The money is just sitting in the bank because Singaporeans aren't making babies (you get the money only if you have a baby).

In one fell swoop, both countries solve their population problems.

Hello, Lee Hsien Loong and Gloria Arroyo?
From Today:

CHURCH BATTLES ARROYO'S MOVE TO CURB BABY BOOM
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'Freedom from Pregnancy' campaign targets runaway population growth

Clement Mesenas Foreign and Commentary Editor
clement@newstoday.com.sg

MANILA - The photograph of a crowded maternity ward in the Philippine capital (right) says it all.

In the Philippines, a largely Catholic country, close to 4,000 babies are born every day. Each year, the population swells by 1.5 million - close to a third that of Singapore.

At the end of last year, the Philippines, already the 12th most populous country in the world, hit the 84 million mark. At an annual growth rate of 2.36 per cent, one of the world's highest, the population will have doubled by 2033 and may well reach 200 million by 2042, putting the country at risk, economists say.
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Technorati tags: Singapore, Philippines, babies, population

Tuesday, March 01, 2005

ACS 119th Founder's Day

Anglo-Chinese School crestJust want to give a shout-out to my alma mater, Anglo-Chinese School.

Happy 119th birthday!
In days of yore
From western shore
Oldham, dauntless hero, came...

...The regions round
Echo the sound
Of ACS forever!
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